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Climate Change: What Difference Can a City Make?

On-air date: 
Mon, 08/03/2015
Listen to or download this episode here: 

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On July 22, Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges joined 60 mayors from around the world for a meeting with Pope Francis on climate change.  The meeting was more than ceremonial.  The Pope believes cities have the power to make a significant contribution to the fight against climate change as well as the often-related issues of extreme poverty, forced migration, and human trafficking.

Hodges was the only mayor of a Midwest city to be invited to the Pope’s meeting.   It turns out Minneapolis is already taking aggressive action on climate change. The Minneapolis Climate Action Plan adopted by the City Council in June of 2013 sets ambitious targets for greenhouse gas reductions.  Using 2006 as the baseline, the city pledges to reduce emissions by 30 percent by 2030 and 80 percent by 2050.

10-9-13 TruthToTell: Community Connections VIII- Who runs Minneapolis, Who should?

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, October 14, 2013

 

It’s week one of KFAI’s Fall Pledge Drive! Call in on Monday morning to pledge your support at 612-341-9030 or donate now online.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

With all the media attention the upcoming, highly-contested Minneapolis Mayoral Race is getting, isn’t it about time we all ask ourselves, how important is the mayoral office in implementing change? TTT’s Andy Driscoll and Michelle Alimoradi discuss the key people, institution, and otherwise that are making things happen in Minnesota’s biggest city. More importantly, we discuss with our panelists and audience members ‘Who should run Minneapolis?’ We consider what all of our roles are as citizens, voters, tax-payers, parents, students, and the like. How do we make Minneapolis a city that truly works for everyone? Join us for this important pre-election discussion.

TTT partners with the Community Development Club and the Center for Civic Engagement at the Minneapolis Community and Technical College to present this one-of-a-kind public forum.

The telecast of this forum will air Monday, October 14 at 8pm on SPNN St. Paul Cable Channel 19 and MTN Minneapolis Cable Channel 16Subsequent broadcasts will also be available to northern metro suburban cable subscribers and online.

TruthToTell: Community Connections is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has enabled TruthToTell to partner with KFAI Fresh Air Radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners to present these discussions and dialogues on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics for radio, television and online distribution.

PANELISTS: 

CAM GORDON- Minneapolis Ward 2 City Councilmember

CAT SALONEK- Community Organizer, OccupyHomesMN

LENA JONES- MCTC Political Science Instructor

BETH HAWKINS- Freelance Twin Cities Journalist/Blogger


MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, October 7, 2013

PLEASE DONATE $10 to HELP TTT HERE!

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What is it about mental illness that makes people turn a blind eye to the realities around them – yes, most probably in their families or themselves? Why have we as a species come to see behavioral health as something to run away from, not only as a blot on the rest of our families, but somehow raising questions that some sort of inherited mental illness will get us locked up or killed – as too many Americans with mental illness have been?

A crisis? Absolutely, and the tougher the times, the worse the crises. And we’ve criminalized mental illness such that those acting out are too often shot down by police officers.

But those are just a few of the issues facing us when, according to research from the Wilder Foundation, “the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)estimated that 45.1 million adults, or nearly 20 percent of the population, had a mental illness in the past year; 11 million adults had a serious mental illness in the past year. Additionally, nearly 9 million adults had a substance use disorder in the previous year.”

Applying SAMHSA’s estimates to the number of adults in Dakota, Ramsey, and Washington Counties, Wilder reports, it is estimated that 245,800 adults living in the East Metro alone had a mental illness in the past year with an estimated 59,300 adults having a serious mental illness, and 49,170 had a substance abuse problem in the past year.

(Serious mental illnesses are diagnosable mental disorders that interfere with or limit one or more major life activities for adults. Conditions include bipolar disorder, dual diagnosis, major depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and schizophrenia.)

Now, on this beginning day of Mental Health Awareness Week, we talk with those dealing with mental health crises, urgent care for mental health, and even mental illness itself to get us thinking about how we can stop this business of adding stigma upon stigma to a society so wracked by some form of mental illness. And just what IS emotional CPR?

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI try to make sense of an sickness that takes such a back seat to all other human ailments.

GUESTS:

ROGER MEYER – Project Director, Mental Health Crisis Alliance, Ramsey County

ADRIENNE PREHATNEY - Peer Support Specialist, Urgent Care for Adult Mental Health

 

 


PATTI BITNEY STARKE – Executive Director, Mental Health Consumer Survivor Network of MN

 


TruthToTell, Monday 10-14-13-9AM ENCORE- TruthToTell: Community Connections VIII- Who Runs Minneapolis? Who Should? - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/streaming @ KFAI.org

On-air date: 
Mon, 10/14/2013

 

It’s week one of KFAI’s Fall Pledge Drive! Call in on Monday morning to pledge your support at 612-341-9030 or donate now online.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

With all the media attention the upcoming, highly-contested Minneapolis Mayoral Race is getting, isn’t it about time we all ask ourselves, how important is the mayoral office in implementing change? TTT’s Andy Driscoll and Michelle Alimoradi discuss the key people, institution, and otherwise that are making things happen in Minnesota’s biggest city. More importantly, we discuss with our panelists and audience members ‘Who should run Minneapolis?’ We consider what all of our roles are as citizens, voters, tax-payers, parents, students, and the like. How do we make Minneapolis a city that truly works for everyone? Join us for this important pre-election discussion.

TTT partners with the Community Development Club and the Center for Civic Engagement at the Minneapolis Community and Technical College to present this one-of-a-kind public forum.

The telecast of this forum will air Monday, October 14 at 8pm on SPNN St. Paul Cable Channel 19 and MTN Minneapolis Cable Channel 16Subsequent broadcasts will also be available to northern metro suburban cable subscribers and online.

TruthToTell: Community Connections is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has enabled TruthToTell to partner with KFAI Fresh Air Radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners to present these discussions and dialogues on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics for radio, television and online distribution.

PANELISTS: 

CAM GORDON- Minneapolis Ward 2 City Councilmember

CAT SALONEK- Community Organizer, OccupyHomesMN

LENA JONES- MCTC Political Science Instructor

BETH HAWKINS- Freelance Twin Cities Journalist/Blogger

10-9-13 TruthToTell: Community Connections VIII- Who runs Minneapolis, Who should?

Who are the key people, or institutions that are making things happen in Minnesota's biggest city? More importantly, we'll discuss with our panelists and audience members 'Who should run Minneapolis?' We'll consider what all of our roles are as citizen, voters, tax-payers, parents, students, and the like. How do we make Minneapolis a city that truly works for everyone?

Wednesday October 9, Who Runs Minneapolis? Who Should?, from TruthToTell: Community Connections

 

TruthToTell's Andy Driscoll and Michelle Alimoradi get perspective on municipal power in Minneapolis from a community organizer, city official, independent journalist, and an academic in the 8th forum of the Community Connections series. Wedneday, October 9 at 7pm at Minneapolis Community and Technical College.

Join us at Minneapolis Community and Technical College on Wednesday, October 9, 6:30-7:30pm. 

With all the media attention the upcoming, highly-contested Minneapolis Mayoral Race is getting, isn’t it about time we all ask ourselves, how important is the mayoral office in implementing change? Who are the key people or institutions that are making things happen in Minnesota’s biggest city? More importantly, we’ll discuss with our panelists and audience members thoughts on ‘Who should run Minneapolis?’ We’ll consider what all of our roles are as citizens, voters, tax-payers, parents, students, and the like.  How do we make Minneapolis a city that truly works for everyone? Join us for this important pre-election discussion.

TTT partners with the Community Development Club and the Center for Civic Engagement at the Minneapolis Community and Technical College to present this one-of-a-kind televised public forum. This event is free and open to the public to attend and participate. Light refreshments will be served.  

Show audio will be streamed live from 7:00-8:30PM October 9. Interested stations and individuals should inquire with Andy or Michelle for information on streaming. Additional distribution will come on TruthToTell’s regular air slot at 9:00 AM on October 14 on KFAI, and on television at 8:00 PM on October 14 on SPNN St. Paul Cable Channel 19, and MTN Minneapolis Cable Channel 16. Subsequent broadcasts will also be available to northern metro suburban cable subscribers and online.

RSVP for this event.

TruthToTell: Community Connections is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has enabled TruthToTell to partner with KFAI Fresh Air Radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners to present these discussions and dialogues on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics for radio, television and online distribution.

On-air guests: 

CAM GORDON- Minneapolis Ward 2 City Councilmember

CAT SALONEK- Community Organizer, OccupyHomesMN

LENA JONES- MCTC Political Science Instructor

BETH HAWKINS- Freelance Twin Cities Journalist/Blogger

TruthToTell, Sept 9: Minneapolis Mayor’s Race- Can Rank Choice Voting Meet the Test?

This year, Minneapolis' recently adopted ranked choice voting system will be put to the test with 35 candidates vying for the mayor’s office.

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PLEASE DONATE $10 to HELP TTT HERE!

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In 2009 Minneapolis became one of the nation’s largest cities to implement Ranked Choice Voting. Led by the citizen’s organization, Fair Vote Minnesota, proponents argued that RCV offered voters greater choice.  Just four years later, Minneapolis voters do indeed have greater choice—in fact thirty five candidates for mayor as well as a variety of highly contested city council races. 

Some critics of Ranked Choice Voting expect an election mash-up Supporters are confident that the city—and the system—are equal to the challenge.

What can Minneapolis voters expect when they enter the voting booth?  Does having so many candidates enhance democratic choice or are there negative consequences? Looking forward, what changes –if any- should be made in Minneapolis’s election system? 

Our guests this week are perfectly situated to shed light on these and other questions as we look forward to what will be a truly historic election in Minneapolis.  Join TruthToTell’s Michelle Alimoradi and Tom O’Connell for this conversation Monday morning, September 8 at 9am. 

On-air guests: 

Dr.  Matthew Filner - Associate Professor of Political Science at Metropolitan State University, specialist in Minneapolis municipal politics

Cam Gordon - Green Party, Minneapolis’s 2nd Ward City Councilmember, Chair of City Council Elections Committee.

Jeanne Massey - director of Fair Vote Minnesota, one of the nation’s biggest advocates for Ranked Choice Voting. 

Casey Carl-Minneapolis City Clerk, responsible for maintaining the efficiency and integrity of the city’s election process. 

TruthToTell, Sept 9: Minneapolis Mayor’s Race- Can Rank Choice Voting Meet the Test? - Audio Here - Video Coming

On-air date: 
Mon, 09/09/2013
Listen to or download this episode here: 

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

In 2009 Minneapolis became one of the nation’s largest cities to implement Ranked Choice Voting. Led by the citizen’s organization, Fair Vote Minnesota, proponents argued that RCV offered voters greater choice.  Just four years later, Minneapolis voters do indeed have greater choice—in fact thirty five candidates for mayor as well as a variety of highly contested city council races. 

Some critics of Ranked Choice Voting expect an election mash-up Supporters are confident that the city—and the system—are equal to the challenge.

What can Minneapolis voters expect when they enter the voting booth?  Does having so many candidates enhance democratic choice or are there negative consequences? Looking forward, what changes –if any- should be made in Minneapolis’s election system? 

Our guests this week are perfectly situated to shed light on these and other questions as we look forward to what will be a truly historic election in Minneapolis.  Join TruthToTell’s Michelle Alimoradi and Tom O’Connell for this conversation Monday morning, September 8 at 9am. 

 Guests: 

Dr.  Matthew Filner - Associate Professor of Political Science at Metropolitan State University, specialist in Minneapolis municipal politics

Cam Gordon - Green Party, Minneapolis’s 2nd Ward City Councilmember, Chair of City Council Elections Committee.

Jeanne Massey - director of Fair Vote Minnesota, one of the nation’s biggest advocates for Ranked Choice Voting. 

Casey Carl- Minneapolis City Clerk, responsible for maintaining the efficiency and integrity of the city’s election process. 


First Person Radio-Weds, Sep 7 @9:00AM: JUDY PASTERNAK: Yellow Dirt Author; TruthToTell, Sept 5: CORRIDOR HOUSING: Assuring Affordability as Rails Go Down

First Person Radio-Weds, Sep 7 @9:00AM: JUDY PASTERNAK: Yellow Dirt Author -KFAI FM90.3/106.7/@KFAI.org

A craggy mesa once housed Monument No. 2, the hottest, richest, most productive uranium mine in the Navajo homeland, in a remote desert near the Arizona-Utah line. To the families who have dwelled for generations in the spring-fed valley below, the mesa is the wounded center of their world. They and the hundreds of Indians who labored at the mine have been forever changed by the government’s desperate press for more nuclear weapons than any other nation on Earth.

Yellow Dirt is their story.

It is the saga of four generations whose lives have been shaped by uranium.
What happened at Monument No. 2 was repeated in communities across the reservation. Despite warnings from doctors and scientists that long-term exposure could be harmful, even fatal, thousands of miners worked unprotected. Long after the uranium boom ended, the neighbors continued to live with contamination. The radioactive “yellow dirt” ended up in their drinking supplies, in their walls and floors, in their playgrounds, their bread ovens, their churches and even their garbage dumps.

Few knew what had happened until Judy Pasternak wrote a prizewinning Los Angeles Times series that galvanized a powerful Congressman and a famous prosecutor to press for redress and repair of the grievous damage.

In Yellow Dirt, Pasternak provides gripping new details. She introduces the family of Adakai the Gambler, his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, whose fates were intertwined with that of Monument No. 2 and with decisions made without their knowledge in distant capitals and labs. She weaves the personal and the political into a chronicle of betrayal, of willful negligence, and ultimately, of reckoning.

Join us on September 7th as First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talk with award winning author Judy Pasternak about her stunning book: Yellow Dirt: An American Story of a Poisoned Land and a People Betrayed. The book examines in depth the effects of uranium mining on the Dine (Navajo) lands, looking closely at what happened to several families who built houses using contaminated materials and drank from water poisoned with uranium. The book is a must read for everyone in Indian Country and those concerned about Indian lands and rights.
Judy Pasternak is an editor with Bloomberg News in Washington and a former reporter for the Los Angeles Times, where she wrote about subjects ranging from a band of right-wing extremist bank robbers to the giant black hole at the center of the Milky Way.Yellow Dirt, her first book, made two "Best of 2010" lists: Publisher's Weekly and the Christian Science Monitor. The book has also won awards for literary non-fiction, investigative journalism and environmental journalism. She is married, with one son.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Mon., Sept 5@9AM: CORRIDOR HOUSING: Assuring Affordability as Rails Go Down–AUDIO HERE; VIDEO ARCHIVE HERE

Watch us from Studio 5! TruthToTell is now seen live on Livestream and later on Blip.tv or in iTunes

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Central Corridor light rail system is taking shape – too slowly for many, fairly quickly for others. Rails have already been laid down close to the storage and maintenance facility that the old Gillette Building is becoming, but the infrastructure is taking shape along University Avenue as we watch the station stops rise from the rubble of sewer and electric re-installation and new road laid alongside the work now navigable. The cars will be running in 2014. There’s excitement in the air, along with consternation.

What remains less sure, especially as construction will start to enter the avenue segments much closer to businesses and residences in the eastern sector where small businesses and more modest homeowner fear a limited life in the midst of light rail disruption, is whether such small, often established Asian businesses and corridor residents of color can survive.

Housing is already in upheaval throughout that area, which includes the old Rondo neighborhood and Frogtown. Rondo – most of which remembers its destruction at the hands of highway engineers in the mid-1960s when I-94 was gouged out of the community – and sat there for months unfinished. Such events raise fears that the housing and commercial development craze that often accompanies rail transit projects will leave these same folks behind and behind the 8-Ball when it comes to home values, further foreclosures, and loss of business integrity.

When such development hits, land values shoot up because demand skyrockets around fixed rail. This puts present renters, homeowners and small businesses in a bind because they can see their property taxes and rents shoot up right along with those values, leaving current residents unable to pay the freight. It’s worse, of course, in this no growth, high unemployment economy when folks who live around there have lost their jobs in higher numbers than most. The unemployment rate in our core cities hovers around 20%-25% or more. Unforgivable that they should suffer any further. Housing affordability is paramount.

Most of the folks who live and work in these areas are getting their advocates out there and groups concerned with affordable housing issues are coalescing to plan and stave off the potential exploitation that often arrives with the rails. The Metropolitan Council will oversee affordable housing planning, but it should involve many organizations and communities.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI query four of such activists – a small slice of the large community coming together – about the beginnings of plans to assure that housing that rises or survives in that area meets the needs of the community at least as much as those wishing to move into the new, transit-friendly structures that will dot the Central Corridor from downtown St. Paul to the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood in Minneapolis.

GUESTS:

METRIC GILES – Organizing and Policy Specialist, Community Stabilization Project

EVE MARIE SWAN – Facilitator, Save Our HomesCentral Corridor Community Advocate

CAM GORDON – Councilmember, Ward 2, Minneapolis

CHIP HALBACH –Executive Director, Minnesota Housing Partnership

Additional resources:

CENTRAL CORRIDOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

 Central Corridor & Affordable Housing Resource Library

"2 x 4" Quarterly Housing Indicators

THE BIG PICTURE PROJECT Community Meeting Flyer

PROGRESS ON AFFORDABLE HOUSING DEPENDS ON BROAD COLLABORATION

TruthToTell, Mon., Sept 5@9AM: CORRIDOR HOUSING: Assuring Affordability as Rails Go Down; First Person Radio Aug 31: BRENDA CHILD, PhD, MIGUEL VARGAS: UofM Indian Studies and Boarding School Author-AUDIO Link Below

TruthToTell, Mon., Sept 5@9AM: CORRIDOR HOUSING: Assuring Affordability as Rails Go Down-KFAI 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org/Livestream.com

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

Watch us from Studio 5! TruthToTell is now seen live on Livestream and later on Blip.tv or in iTunes

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 The Central Corridor light rail system is taking shape – too slowly for many, fairly quickly for others. Rails have already been laid down close to the storage and maintenance facility that the old Gillette Building is becoming, but the infrastructure is taking shape along University Avenue as we watch the station stops rise from the rubble of sewer and electric re-installation and new road laid alongside the work now navigable. The cars will be running in 2014. There’s excitement in the air, along with consternation.

When the inevitable development hits, land values shoot up because demand skyrockets around fixed rail. This puts present renters, homeowners and small businesses in a bind because they can see their property taxes and rents shoot up right along with those values, leaving current residents unable to pay the freight. It’s worse, of course, in this no growth, high unemployment economy when folks who live around there have lost their jobs in higher numbers than most. The unemployment rate in our core cities hovers around 20%-25% or more. Unforgivable that they should suffer any further. Housing affordability is paramount.

Most of the folks who live and work in these areas are getting their advocates out there and groups concerned with affordable housing issues are coalescing to plan and stave off the potential exploitation that often arrives with the rails. The Metropolitan Council will oversee affordable housing planning, but it should involve many organizations and communities.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI query four of such activists – a small slice of the large community coming together – about the beginnings of plans to assure that housing that rises or survives in that area meets the needs of the community at least as much as those wishing to move into the new, transit-friendly structures that will dot the Central Corridor from downtown St. Paul to the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood in Minneapolis.

GUESTS:

METRIC GILES – Organizing and Policy Specialist, Community Stabilization Project

EVE MARIE SWAN – Facilitator, Save Our HomesCentral Corridor Community Advocate

CAM GORDON – Councilmember, Ward 2, Minneapolis

CHIP HALBACH –Executive Director, Minnesota Housing Partnership

Additional resources:

CENTRAL CORRIDOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

 Central Corridor & Affordable Housing Resource Library

"2 x 4" Quarterly Housing Indicators

THE BIG PICTURE PROJECT Community Meeting Flyer

PROGRESS ON AFFORDABLE HOUSING DEPENDS ON BROAD COLLABORATION

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

First Person Radio Aug 31: BRENDA CHILD, PhD, MIGUEL VARGAS: UofM Indian Studies and Boarding School Author-AUDIO HERE

 Laura Waterman Wittstock (with Andy Driscoll) talks with Professor Brenda Child, Chair of the Department of American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota and the Department's Community Outreach Coordinator, Miguel Vargas. 

At the University of Minnesota, Child was recipient of the President’s Award for Outstanding Community Service. She was born on and remains a citizen of the Red Lake Ojibwe Reservation in northern Minnesota.

Dr. Child received her PhD in History at the University of Iowa and was a Katrin Lamon Fellow at the School of American Research, Santa Fe, New Mexico. Her book, Boarding School Seasons: American Indian Families, 1900-1940 (University of Nebraska, 1998), won the North American Indian Prose Award.

Child was a consultant to the exhibit, “Remembering Our Indian School Days” at the Heard Museum in Phoenix, Arizona and co-author of the book that accompanied the exhibit, Away From Home (Heard, 2000). She is a board member of the Minnesota Historical Society, the Division of Indian Works, and The Circle newspaper in Minnesota, and chairs the American Indian advisory board to the Eiteljorg Museum in Indianapolis.

Miguel Vargas has been Outreach Coordinator since Fall 2007. He coordinates the Ojibwemodaa Eta! Language Programs and Scholarships, outreaching to K-12 Schools/Youth Programs for visiting opportunities, and moderating the Minnesota Indian Affairs Listserv (MINN-IND).

TruthToTell, Sept 5: CORRIDOR HOUSING: Assuring Affordability as Rails Go Down–AUDIO BELOW; VIDEO UNDER ARCHIVES

On-air date: 
Mon, 09/05/2011

Watch us from Studio 5! TruthToTell is now seen live on Livestream and later on Blip.tv or in iTunes

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Central Corridor light rail system is taking shape – too slowly for many, fairly quickly for others. Rails have already been laid down close to the storage and maintenance facility that the old Gillette Building is becoming, but the infrastructure is taking shape along University Avenue as we watch the station stops rise from the rubble of sewer and electric re-installation and new road laid alongside the work now navigable. The cars will be running in 2014. There’s excitement in the air, along with consternation.

What remains less sure, especially as construction will start to enter the avenue segments much closer to businesses and residences in the eastern sector where small businesses and more modest homeowner fear a limited life in the midst of light rail disruption, is whether such small, often established Asian businesses and corridor residents of color can survive.

Housing is already in upheaval throughout that area, which includes the old Rondo neighborhood and Frogtown. Rondo – most of which remembers its destruction at the hands of highway engineers in the mid-1960s when I-94 was gouged out of the community – and sat there for months unfinished. Such events raise fears that the housing and commercial development craze that often accompanies rail transit projects will leave these same folks behind and behind the 8-Ball when it comes to home values, further foreclosures, and loss of business integrity.

When such development hits, land values shoot up because demand skyrockets around fixed rail. This puts present renters, homeowners and small businesses in a bind because they can see their property taxes and rents shoot up right along with those values, leaving current residents unable to pay the freight. It’s worse, of course, in this no growth, high unemployment economy when folks who live around there have lost their jobs in higher numbers than most. The unemployment rate in our core cities hovers around 20%-25% or more. Unforgivable that they should suffer any further. Housing affordability is paramount.

Most of the folks who live and work in these areas are getting their advocates out there and groups concerned with affordable housing issues are coalescing to plan and stave off the potential exploitation that often arrives with the rails. The Metropolitan Council will oversee affordable housing planning, but it should involve many organizations and communities.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI query four of such activists – a small slice of the large community coming together – about the beginnings of plans to assure that housing that rises or survives in that area meets the needs of the community at least as much as those wishing to move into the new, transit-friendly structures that will dot the Central Corridor from downtown St. Paul to the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood in Minneapolis.

GUESTS:

METRIC GILES – Organizing and Policy Specialist, Community Stabilization Project

EVE MARIE SWAN – Facilitator, Save Our Homes; Central Corridor Community Advocate

CAM GORDON – Councilmember, Ward 2, Minneapolis

CHIP HALBACH –Executive Director, Minnesota Housing Partnership

Additional resources:

CENTRAL CORRIDOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

 Central Corridor & Affordable Housing Resource Library

"2 x 4" Quarterly Housing Indicators

THE BIG PICTURE PROJECT Community Meeting Flyer

PROGRESS ON AFFORDABLE HOUSING DEPENDS ON BROAD COLLABORATION



57:04 minutes (52.25 MB)