elections

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Mid-Term Elections: Your Vote, Your Choice

On-air date: 
Mon, 11/03/2014
Listen to or download this episode here: 

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Voters will head to the polls on Tuesday to decide a U.S. Senate seat, all of Minnesota’s eight U.S. House seats, as well as governor, attorney general, secretary of state and state auditor.

Have you decided which way you're voting? Join Siobhan Kierans and Tom O'Connell when they talk about Minnesota's mid-term elections — the issues, the candidates and their positions.

TruthToTell 9-9-13 Excerpt: Minneapolis City Clerk explains the 2013 Ranked Choice Ballot

 

Minneapolis City Clerk Casey Clark explains the ranked choice voting ballot for 2013 and talks about the new voting machines.

 

TruthToTell, Sept 9: Minneapolis Mayor’s Race- Can Rank Choice Voting Meet the Test?

This year, Minneapolis' recently adopted ranked choice voting system will be put to the test with 35 candidates vying for the mayor’s office.

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PLEASE DONATE $10 to HELP TTT HERE!

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In 2009 Minneapolis became one of the nation’s largest cities to implement Ranked Choice Voting. Led by the citizen’s organization, Fair Vote Minnesota, proponents argued that RCV offered voters greater choice.  Just four years later, Minneapolis voters do indeed have greater choice—in fact thirty five candidates for mayor as well as a variety of highly contested city council races. 

Some critics of Ranked Choice Voting expect an election mash-up Supporters are confident that the city—and the system—are equal to the challenge.

What can Minneapolis voters expect when they enter the voting booth?  Does having so many candidates enhance democratic choice or are there negative consequences? Looking forward, what changes –if any- should be made in Minneapolis’s election system? 

Our guests this week are perfectly situated to shed light on these and other questions as we look forward to what will be a truly historic election in Minneapolis.  Join TruthToTell’s Michelle Alimoradi and Tom O’Connell for this conversation Monday morning, September 8 at 9am. 

On-air guests: 

Dr.  Matthew Filner - Associate Professor of Political Science at Metropolitan State University, specialist in Minneapolis municipal politics

Cam Gordon - Green Party, Minneapolis’s 2nd Ward City Councilmember, Chair of City Council Elections Committee.

Jeanne Massey - director of Fair Vote Minnesota, one of the nation’s biggest advocates for Ranked Choice Voting. 

Casey Carl-Minneapolis City Clerk, responsible for maintaining the efficiency and integrity of the city’s election process. 

TruthToTell, Sept 9: Minneapolis Mayor’s Race- Can Rank Choice Voting Meet the Test? - Audio Here - Video Coming

On-air date: 
Mon, 09/09/2013
Listen to or download this episode here: 

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

In 2009 Minneapolis became one of the nation’s largest cities to implement Ranked Choice Voting. Led by the citizen’s organization, Fair Vote Minnesota, proponents argued that RCV offered voters greater choice.  Just four years later, Minneapolis voters do indeed have greater choice—in fact thirty five candidates for mayor as well as a variety of highly contested city council races. 

Some critics of Ranked Choice Voting expect an election mash-up Supporters are confident that the city—and the system—are equal to the challenge.

What can Minneapolis voters expect when they enter the voting booth?  Does having so many candidates enhance democratic choice or are there negative consequences? Looking forward, what changes –if any- should be made in Minneapolis’s election system? 

Our guests this week are perfectly situated to shed light on these and other questions as we look forward to what will be a truly historic election in Minneapolis.  Join TruthToTell’s Michelle Alimoradi and Tom O’Connell for this conversation Monday morning, September 8 at 9am. 

 Guests: 

Dr.  Matthew Filner - Associate Professor of Political Science at Metropolitan State University, specialist in Minneapolis municipal politics

Cam Gordon - Green Party, Minneapolis’s 2nd Ward City Councilmember, Chair of City Council Elections Committee.

Jeanne Massey - director of Fair Vote Minnesota, one of the nation’s biggest advocates for Ranked Choice Voting. 

Casey Carl- Minneapolis City Clerk, responsible for maintaining the efficiency and integrity of the city’s election process. 


truthToTell, Monday, Dec 3–9AM: METROPOLITAN STATE: That OTHER 4-year Public University; TruthToTell, NOV 26: ENCORE: ALL ABOUT THE COURTS AND JUDGES: Dispensing Justice? Or Bias?

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, December 3, 2012

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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New Main Rising.

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The story of that other Twin Cities four-year higher education institution – Metropolitan State University – never really started out as a competitor for the University of Minnesota. It was designed to do much of what the UofM was not doing – appealing to older, especially older workers from underserved populations – surely more Latinos and African-Americans – to complete their degree programs based on the competence they had acquired in their lives and work.

It started in 1971 as Minnesota Metropolitan State College, thanks to a legislative mandate, and some 46 faculty members – more than half of them part time, what they now refer to as community faculty – started classes in 1972, and graduated their first 12 students in 1973. They did all this from unlikely venues for a higher education institution – from a storeroom in the Capital Center Skyway as the first administration office to rather ill-equipped “classrooms” in downtown buildings, church basements, synagogues and outlying commercial structures.

The whole thing was originally geared to cover only the upper division – the last two years – of a normal 4-year college, but highly keyed to individuals wanting to – finally – finish their undergraduate education. This non-traditional approach turned Metro State into something of an enclave of rebellious promoters of higher ed who believed in the inherent learning abilities of people for whom completing a degree had been difficult, if not impossible, in the normal course of life: poverty, the need to work instead of the formally schooled, racism, etc.

This became a school that recruited and welcomed those folks, teaching them what it means to be an educated person, preparing them for learning late in life and for lifelong learning – never stopping to see learning as valuable, ongoing asset in all we do. For those who had working and living experiences that could be converted to college credit, devices and evaluations were created to recognize them. This, too, shortened the time commitment that would be otherwise required to get that BA degree. (Eventually, Metro started adding several Master’s programs).

Presidents and faculty were picked to run the place who agreed with the philosophy that all people can learn – and should and be credited for it – and you didn’t need too formal an enrolment and teaching environment to do so. A cadre of counselors and advisers who doubled as instructors guided students from getting the word out to dragging them in the door to sign on and helping them design their degree programs – a mishmash of classes, tests, transfer credits and prior learning experiences. Dr. David Sweet was the inaugural president, followed by Dr. Reatha Clark King and several others leading up to today’s Dr. Sue K. Hammersmith. The campus is large and growing all the time, familiar for it’s 4-story glass edifice sitting on Dayton’s Bluff overlooking downtown St. Paul. Several hundred faculty teach several thousands of students, now.

Then, in 1994, the Legislature turn what had been a beloved rebel into a true 4-year university, so great was the need to provide not only a continuum from community and technical colleges to Metro, but a true freshman through senior alternative to the U, often in applied curriculums – that is, classes that prepared for jobs at less expensive rates than the larger school in town. Not everyone in this school thought that was progress.

This week, TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL (Class of 2002) and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with one of the truly successful graduate, now a community faculty member and a newly reelected state senator; an old guard professor near retirement; a graduate for whom Metro changed an otherwise troubled career and who now contributes mightily to its curriculum; and yet another who constantly reminds the administration of its duty to a now-huge faculty and student body:

GUESTS:

 STATE SEN. SANDRA PAPPAS (DFL-65, St. Paul) – President, Minnesota State Senate, Metro State Community Faculty member; Metro State graduate.

 TOM O’CONNELL – Professor of Political Science and History, former Dean of Social Sciences, Metropolitan State University.

 


 

 JASON SOLE – Community Faculty, Criminal Justice Studies, Metropolitan State University

 MONTE BUTE – Associate Professor, Social Sciences, Metropolitan State University

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MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, November 26, 2012

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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Back in February of this year and a couple of years backTruthToTell aired a couple of editions exploring the possibility of instituting an entirely new way of selecting our judges in Minnesota. Wisconsin’s circus of judicial elections, especially for the state Supreme Court over there (think shoving the face of a colleague there last year), is a very bad one in the minds of many court-watchers. That electoral system only mimics those envisioned in the outgrowth of the US Supreme Court ruling negating one of Minnesota’s cherished Judicial Canons that had, till then, prohibited as a possible conflict any overt campaign discussion of issues that could one day come before the court for which a given candidate was running. The 5-4 SCOTUS ruling opened wide the political campaigns of judges and justices, and this politicization of judicial races portended for the legal community nothing but trouble.

Legislation promoting a state constitutional amendment ordering new system of appointing judges and justices, then putting their performance before public scrutiny later – when their terms came up for renewal – has fared poorly over several sessions, despite it promotion by some of Minnesota’s most prestigious political and legal celebrities.

I erred in last Winter’s announcement and script when I stated that this new system of appointing judges called “retention elections” – was supported by Hennepin County District Judge Kevin Burke, whose credentials as a Chief Judge and an Assistant Chief Judge among the 62 judges of the Hennepin Court are significant, to say the least. Judge Burke wrote and simply stated he has never supported the proposed system.

So I wrote and called to discover that Judge Burke favors the election of judges in Minnesota. I then suggested that he come on, not just to defend the judicial electoral status quo, or some variation of it, but to discuss the plethora of reforms needed in the courts and criminal justice system.

So. From the horse’s mouth, as it were, we delve into court reforms and criminal justice disparities along with the ways judicial campaigns should be conducted if straight elections are to remain our primary selection method.

Of course, governors will continue to appoint when judges step down or retire before their terms are completed, and the field of candidates will be, as currently done, whittled to three by a nonpartisan merit selection commission, and from those top three contenders, the governor will usually – but not always – make his (or her) appointment. He or she may appoint whomever they wish as Gov. Pawlenty and others have done.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI spend the hour with:

HENNEPIN COUNTY DISTRICT JUDGE KEVIN BURKE.

 

 


TruthToTell, Monday, Nov. 26−9AM: ALL ABOUT THE COURTS AND JUDGES: Dispensing Justice? Or Bias?

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, November 26, 2012

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Back in February of this year and a couple of years backTruthToTell aired a couple of editions exploring the possibility of instituting an entirely new way of selecting our judges in Minnesota. Wisconsin’s circus of judicial elections, especially for the state Supreme Court over there (think shoving the face of a colleague there last year), is a very bad one in the minds of many court-watchers. That electoral system only mimics those envisioned in the outgrowth of the US Supreme Court ruling negating one of Minnesota’s cherished Judicial Canons that had, till then, prohibited as a possible conflict any overt campaign discussion of issues that could one day come before the court for which a given candidate was running. The 5-4 SCOTUS ruling opened wide the political campaigns of judges and justices, and this politicization of judicial races portended for the legal community nothing but trouble.

Legislation promoting a state constitutional amendment ordering new system of appointing judges and justices, then putting their performance before public scrutiny later – when their terms came up for renewal – has fared poorly over several sessions, despite it promotion by some of Minnesota’s most prestigious political and legal celebrities.

I erred in last Winter’s announcement and script when I stated that this new system of appointing judges called “retention elections” – was supported by Hennepin County District Judge Kevin Burke, whose credentials as a Chief Judge and an Assistant Chief Judge among the 62 judges of the Hennepin Court are significant, to say the least. Judge Burke wrote and simply stated he has never supported the proposed system.

So I wrote and called to discover that Judge Burke favors the election of judges in Minnesota. I then suggested that he come on, not just to defend the judicial electoral status quo, or some variation of it, but to discuss the plethora of reforms needed in the courts and criminal justice system.

So. From the horse’s mouth, as it were, we delve into court reforms and criminal justice disparities along with the ways judicial campaigns should be conducted if straight elections are to remain our primary selection method.

Of course, governors will continue to appoint when judges step down or retire before their terms are completed, and the field of candidates will be, as currently done, whittled to three by a nonpartisan merit selection commission, and from those top three contenders, the governor will usually – but not always – make his (or her) appointment. He or she may appoint whomever they wish as Gov. Pawlenty and others have done.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI spend the hour with:

HENNEPIN COUNTY DISTRICT JUDGE KEVIN BURKE.

 

 


No comments yet - be the first!

 

MOST RECENT SHOW

Listen to our most recent show here, or browse our archives >

Monday, November 19, 2012

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

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We had an outstanding conversation on this show. Listen in below:

As this is written, the this year’s sold-out 4th Annual Overcoming Racism Conference was under way Friday and Saturday at Metropolitan State University’s East Side St. Paul campus. Titled Decolonizing Minnesota & Beyond: Historical & Current Struggles, the lineup of keynoters & workshops for the conference include several from Greater Minnesota and take on more Native perspectives in this 150th year commemorating the Dakota War of 1862.

Last year, the author of The White Racial Frame, Joe Feagin, was our guest, among others, and this conference continues exploring that frame in the ongoing problems America’s near-pathological consumption with race and its stereotyping obsessions has persisted from the earliest days of settlement. Starting with the Doctrine of Discovery as originating in the Vatican wherein a dominant white power overcomes an indigenous people, ostensibly for the purpose of manifest destiny, it is wholly justified that such white power engage in necessary genocide to plant the seeds of God’s chosen people in a new land. The Doctrine of Discovery is described in detail by California-based Native lawyer and Judge Robert Miller.

The mindset of that doctrine has essentially controlled the racism and ongoing colonialism we’ve witnessed over several centuries in Africa, Asia and the Western Hemisphere and in the enslavement and genocide of peoples everywhere, especially in the United States, as something to serve the white power structure here.

Monday morning, both keynote speakers are with us live, as well as a founding co-chair of the Facilitating Racial Equity Forum (FREC), Dr. Herb Perkins, Co-founder and Co-director, Antiracism Study-Dialogue Circles, or ASDIC Metamorphosis. FREC has sponsored these annual conferences.

Those keynoters are two of this region’s, nay, the country’s most eloquent speakers on issues of lingering colonialism and racial inequity. From the conference program:

Waziyatawin is a Dakota writer, teacher, and activist committed to the development of liberation strategies that will support the recovery of Indigenous ways of being, the reclamation of Indigenous homelands, and the eradication of colonial institutions. She is the Indigenous Peoples Research Chair of the Indigenous Governance Program at University of Victoria. Waziyatawin is also author of What Does Justice Look Like?

Dr. Rose Brewer is professor of African American and African Studies at the University of Minnesota and co-author of The Color of Wealth. 

This excellent conference may be sold out, but, perhaps our show is one way to visit the conference without the ability to be there in person. At least some important highlights can be revisited with our guests, and TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI welcome these three racial justice heavyweights to the program.

GUESTS:

  WAZIYATAWIN – Dakota writer, teacher, and activist; author of What Does Justice Look Like?


 DR. ROSE BREWER – professor of African American and African Studies,  University of Minnesota; co-author of The Color of Wealth




 DR. HERB PERKINS, Co-founder-Co-director, Antiracism Study-Dialogue Circles, or ASDIC Metamorphosis; founding Co-chair of the Facilitating Racial Equity Forum (FREC)


TruthToTell, NOV 26: ENCORE: ALL ABOUT THE COURTS AND JUDGES: Dispensing Justice? Or Bias? - Audio PODCAST Below

On-air date: 
Mon, 11/26/2012
Listen to or download this episode here: 

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Back in February of this year and a couple of years back, TruthToTell aired a couple of editions exploring the possibility of instituting an entirely new way of selecting our judges in Minnesota. Wisconsin’s circus of judicial elections, especially for the state Supreme Court over there (think shoving the face of a colleague there last year), is a very bad one in the minds of many court-watchers. That electoral system only mimics those envisioned in the outgrowth of the US Supreme Court ruling negating one of Minnesota’s cherished Judicial Canons that had, till then, prohibited as a possible conflict any overt campaign discussion of issues that could one day come before the court for which a given candidate was running. The 5-4 SCOTUS ruling opened wide the political campaigns of judges and justices, and this politicization of judicial races portended for the legal community nothing but trouble.

Legislation promoting a state constitutional amendment ordering new system of appointing judges and justices, then putting their performance before public scrutiny later – when their terms came up for renewal – has fared poorly over several sessions, despite it promotion by some of Minnesota’s most prestigious political and legal celebrities.

I erred in last Winter’s announcement and script when I stated that this new system of appointing judges called “retention elections” – was supported by Hennepin County District Judge Kevin Burke, whose credentials as a Chief Judge and an Assistant Chief Judge among the 62 judges of the Hennepin Court are significant, to say the least. Judge Burke wrote and simply stated he has never supported the proposed system.

So I wrote and called to discover that Judge Burke favors the election of judges in Minnesota. I then suggested that he come on, not just to defend the judicial electoral status quo, or some variation of it, but to discuss the plethora of reforms needed in the courts and criminal justice system.

So. From the horse’s mouth, as it were, we delve into court reforms and criminal justice disparities along with the ways judicial campaigns should be conducted if straight elections are to remain our primary selection method.

Of course, governors will continue to appoint when judges step down or retire before their terms are completed, and the field of candidates will be, as currently done, whittled to three by a nonpartisan merit selection commission, and from those top three contenders, the governor will usually – but not always – make his (or her) appointment. He or she may appoint whomever they wish as Gov. Pawlenty and others have done.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI spend the hour with:

HENNEPIN COUNTY DISTRICT JUDGE KEVIN BURKE.

 

 


TruthToTell, Monday, July 9−9AM: ALL ABOUT THE COURTS AND JUDGES: Dispensing Justice? Or Bias? - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/KFAI.org

Monday, July 9, 2012

Remember – call and join the conversation – 612-341-0980 – or Tweet us @TTTAndyDriscoll or post onTruthToTell’s Facebook page.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Back in February of this year and a couple of years backTruthToTell aired a couple of editions exploring the possibility of instituting an entirely new way of selecting our judges in Minnesota. Wisconsin’s circus of judicial elections, especially for the state Supreme Court over there (think shoving the face of a colleague there last year), is a very bad one in the minds of many court-watchers. That electoral system only mimics those envisioned in the outgrowth of the US Supreme Court ruling negating one of Minnesota’s cherished Judicial Canons that had, till then, prohibited as a possible conflict any overt campaign discussion of issues that could one day come before the court for which a given candidate was running. The 5-4 SCOTUS ruling opened wide the political campaigns of judges and justices, and this politicization of judicial races portended for the legal community nothing but trouble.

Legislation promoting a state constitutional amendment ordering new system of appointing judges and justices, then putting their performance before public scrutiny later – when their terms came up for renewal – has fared poorly over several sessions, despite it promotion by some of Minnesota’s most prestigious political and legal celebrities.

I erred in last Winter’s announcement and script when I stated that this new system of appointing judges called “retention elections” – was supported by Hennepin County District Judge Kevin Burke, whose credentials as a Chief Judge and an Assistant Chief Judge among the 62 judges of the Hennepin Court are significant, to say the least. Judge Burke wrote and simply stated he has never supported the proposed system.

So I wrote and called to discover that Judge Burke favors the election of judges in Minnesota. I then suggested that he come on, not just to defend the judicial electoral status quo, or some variation of it, but to discuss the plethora of reforms needed in the courts and criminal justice system.

So. From the horse’s mouth, as it were, we can delve into court reforms and criminal justice disparities along with the ways judicial campaigns should be conducted if straight elections are to remain our primary selection method.

Of course, governors will continue to appoint when judges step down or retire before their terms are completed, and the field of candidates will be, as currently done, whittled to three by a nonpartisan merit selection commission, and from those top three contenders, the governor will usually – but not always – make his (or her) appointment. He or she may appoint whomever they wish as Gov. Pawlenty and others have done.

We – TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI will spend the hour with:

HENNEPIN COUNTY DISTRICT JUDGE KEVIN BURKE.

 

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Monday, July 2, 2012

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

It’s 2012. Four years since the “crash” of 2008, when the real bailout could have been to the bank, but through the device of saving homeowners from the conflagration of foreclosures from the crooked system of subprime loads to people who might not have been able to afford a mortgage of any size, but at usurious interest rates – both conventional and ARMs (adjustable rate mortgages).

Millions who worked hard to keep up their payments to no avail in this economic bust of an economy have been turned out of their homes, some of them from homes they owned for 15 years or more.

Recently, in the spirit of Occupy Wall Street and its local incarnations, Occupy Homes Minnesota has begun stonewalling such foreclosures on behalf of Twin Cities homeowners, many of them in communities of color, where the subprime market ran rampant or interest rates drove payments well beyond the mortgagers ability to keep up.

The foreclosures have thrown thousands into the streets and homeless shelters and left neighborhoods decimated of their housing stock while rising vacancy rates turn communities into war zones.

One of the families resisting with the help of Occupy Homes MN is the Cruz family of South Minneapolis. Despite promises to fix what was an unjust demand for accelerated payments from the beginning – admitted by both PNC Bank Mortgage Company and indicted, but bailed-out mortgage packaging giant, Freddie Mac – several police raids and clashes with protesters has led to well over a dozen arrests – including that of internationally respected Minnesota-based hip hop artist, Brother Ali.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with members of the Cruz family and their advocates as well as Brother Ali himself.

GUESTS:

BROTHER ALI – International Rap Artist and member of the Occupy Homes movement


 

 

•DAVID CRUZ – Son of the first-generation Latino family homeowners losing their home (shown with sister, ALEJANDRA)

•NICK ESPINOSA – An Organizer with Occupy Homes Minnesota

TruthToTell, July 9: ALL ABOUT THE COURTS AND JUDGES: Dispensing Justice? Or Bias? - AUDIO PODCAST is UP

On-air date: 
Mon, 07/09/2012
Listen to or download this episode here: 

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Back in February of this year and a couple of years back, TruthToTell aired a couple of editions exploring the possibility of instituting an entirely new way of selecting our judges in Minnesota. Wisconsin’s circus of judicial elections, especially for the state Supreme Court over there (think shoving the face of a colleague there last year), is a very bad one in the minds of many court-watchers. That electoral system only mimics those envisioned in the outgrowth of the US Supreme Court ruling negating one of Minnesota’s cherished Judicial Canons that had, till then, prohibited as a possible conflict any overt campaign discussion of issues that could one day come before the court for which a given candidate was running. The 5-4 SCOTUS ruling opened wide the political campaigns of judges and justices, and this politicization of judicial races portended for the legal community nothing but trouble.

Legislation promoting a state constitutional amendment ordering new system of appointing judges and justices, then putting their performance before public scrutiny later – when their terms came up for renewal – has fared poorly over several sessions, despite it promotion by some of Minnesota’s most prestigious political and legal celebrities.

I erred in last Winter’s announcement and script when I stated that this new system of appointing judges called “retention elections” – was supported by Hennepin County District Judge Kevin Burke, whose credentials as a Chief Judge and an Assistant Chief Judge among the 62 judges of the Hennepin Court are significant, to say the least. Judge Burke wrote and simply stated he has never supported the proposed system.

So I wrote and called to discover that Judge Burke favors the election of judges in Minnesota. I then suggested that he come on, not just to defend the judicial electoral status quo, or some variation of it, but to discuss the plethora of reforms needed in the courts and criminal justice system.

So. From the horse’s mouth, as it were, we delve into court reforms and criminal justice disparities along with the ways judicial campaigns should be conducted if straight elections are to remain our primary selection method.

Of course, governors will continue to appoint when judges step down or retire before their terms are completed, and the field of candidates will be, as currently done, whittled to three by a nonpartisan merit selection commission, and from those top three contenders, the governor will usually – but not always – make his (or her) appointment. He or she may appoint whomever they wish as Gov. Pawlenty and others have done.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI spend the hour with:

HENNEPIN COUNTY DISTRICT JUDGE KEVIN BURKE.

 

 


SPECIAL TONIGHT-9:00PM: ELECTION COVERAGE with ANDY DRISCOLL & MICHELLE ALIMORADI-KFAI FM 90.3/106.7 & Streaming LIVE KFAI.org

ELECTION DAY IN ST. PAUL!!! You have until 8:00PM to cast your ballot as responsible citizens of the city. In addition to having a bit of fun with the new Ranked Choice Voting system for City Council, you have a chance to step to the plate to pick your legislative leadership and school officials for the next four years.

THEN - LISTEN IN TONIGHT!

9:00PM-ON KFAI , Michelle Alimoradi and Andy Driscoll will be co-anchoring ELECTION NIGHT COVERAGE - featuring guests:

JOE MANSKY - Director, Ramsey County Elections Bureau

YUSEF MGENI,Ward One activist and former St. Paul Schools Minority Education Director 

KAZOUA KONG-THAO -Retiring School Board Member

 

[NO PHOTO AVAILABLE for Anne White]

ANNE WHITE - Union Park Community Council Board Member and its Land Use Chair, as well as President of the Central Corridor group - District Councils Collaborative of St. Paul & Minneapolis.

TUNE IN at 9:00 - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7 or Streaming LIVE at www.KFAI.org