Minneapolis

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Black Lives Matter (So Does White Support)

On-air date: 
Mon, 09/14/2015
Listen to or download this episode here: 

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Through a series of dramatic demonstrations across the country, the Black Lives Matter movement has raised awareness of the troubled relationship between police and African-Americans here in the Twin Cities and across the nation. Polls show that more white Americans are now aware that unjustified acts of police directed at African-Americans do occur. At the same time, as has often happened when African-Americans and other oppressed groups organize to assert their rights, a backlash has emerged.

One striking feature of the Black Lives Matter movement has been the multi-racial composition of its demonstrations. Clearly, there are many whites and members of other ethnic communities who support the movement. But beyond marching, what role can allies play? 

 

Climate Change: What Difference Can a City Make?

On-air date: 
Mon, 08/03/2015
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On July 22, Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges joined 60 mayors from around the world for a meeting with Pope Francis on climate change.  The meeting was more than ceremonial.  The Pope believes cities have the power to make a significant contribution to the fight against climate change as well as the often-related issues of extreme poverty, forced migration, and human trafficking.

Hodges was the only mayor of a Midwest city to be invited to the Pope’s meeting.   It turns out Minneapolis is already taking aggressive action on climate change. The Minneapolis Climate Action Plan adopted by the City Council in June of 2013 sets ambitious targets for greenhouse gas reductions.  Using 2006 as the baseline, the city pledges to reduce emissions by 30 percent by 2030 and 80 percent by 2050.

The Way Forward for Public Education

On-air date: 
Mon, 10/20/2014
Listen to or download this episode here: 

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Any citizen who takes even a minimal interest in public issues has heard of the achievement gap between whites and students of color.  For the civic-minded among us, it is alarming that racial disparities in educational outcomes are especially deep in Minneapolis. And those brave citizens who ask, “What can be done about it?” are greeted with so many answers (often delivered with great passion) that it’s no wonder some are tempted to tune out altogether.

This program is dedicated to the proposition that ideas do matter and when connected with the power to implement can make a positive difference.  Investment in early childhood education, smaller class sizes, community schools, genuine partnerships with parents, granting greater autonomy (and accountability) to teachers and individual schools are just a few examples. 

Some policy ideas are controversial. That’s why policy, power, and politics are linked. And what better time to discuss public policy for public education than during a school board election campaign.  Joining TruthtoTell co-hosts Siobahn Kierens and Tom O’Connell are Don Samuels, at-large candidate for the school board and Michael Diedrich, an education policy fellow with MN 2020. 

TruthtoTell has invited the other three at-large candidates, Iris Altamirano, Rebecca Gagnon and Ira Jordain to join the conversation in the weeks remaining before the election.

Support TruthToTell by donating whatever you can afford here: DONATE NOW.

A New Challenge to Southwest LRT

On-air date: 
Sun, 08/17/2014
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A lawsuit has been filed by the Lakes and Parks Alliance of Minneapolis, alleging that the SWLRT does not comply with state law. The lawsuit is addressed to the mayor and the City Council, and also to the Federal Transit Administration (Chicago) and to the Compliance Office of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) at the office of the US Environmental Protection Agency (Chicago), stating that there was a failure to perform an environmental review by SWLRT.  Some groups believe that the environmental concerns have been satisfied and that the risks to the environment are minor by comparison to the benefits it will bring to the Twin Cities.  While many residents of Minneapolis don’t have a problem with the new system, many have a problem with the process by which the decisions have been made.

Join TTT co-hosts Siobhan Kierans and Tom O’Connell as they discuss this contentious issue with Pastor Paul Slack (ISAIAH and a member of the People’s Transit Coalition), Judy Meath & Mary Pattock (LRT Done Right), Stuart Chazin (Lakes Park Alliance), Susu Jeffrey (Friends of Coldwater) and Anthony Newby (Neighborhoods Organizing for Change).

 

Call and join the conversation at 612/341-0980 or post on Truth To Tell's Facebook page.

PLEASE DONATE $10 TO HELP TTT HERE!

Truth to Tell: Monday, July 5, 2014 — 9 a.m.

On-air date: 
Sat, 07/05/2014
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In honor of the 80th anniversary commemoration of the strike on July 20th, Truth to Tell explores the dynamics of this history-changing struggle.  What was life like for workers in Depression-era Minneapolis?  Why was Local 547 successful in defeating the all-powerful employers group, the Citizen’s Alliance, when other efforts had failed?  What were some of the struggle’s defining moments?  And what was the impact of the ’34 strike on the city of Minneapolis, the state of Minnesota, and the nation as a whole?


On-air guests: 

  Bryan Palmer is author of Revolutionary Teamsters: The Minneapolis Teamsters    Strike of 1934

 

 

 Mary Wingerd is an associate professor of history at St. Cloud State University, with  a focus on working class and community history and is the author of North Country:  The Making of Minnesota

 

 

 Dave Riehle, is the retired chair of Local 650, the United Transportation Workers,  labor historian and active member Remember 34.    www.facebook.com/Remember1934

TruthToTell - Monday, Dec 9−9AM: LOCAL POWER GENERATION/OWNERSHIP: The People’s Energy Solutions - KFAI FM 90.3/106.7/Streaming at KFAI.org

UPCOMING SHOW

Tune in this coming Monday from 9:00 am to 10:00 am on KFAI, (90.3 FM in Minneapolis, and 106.7 FM in St. Paul) to catch our upcoming program:

Monday, December 9, 2013

Not too many months ago, a budding movement toward municipal ownershipof energy generation in Minneapolis was cut short by a major public relations campaign by current private regulated monopoly providers,Xcel (for electric service) and CenterPoint Energy (formerly Minnegasco) to defeat the proposal.

The proposers were trying to take advantage of the city’s infrequent power franchise renewal process (where Xcel and CenterPoint pay fees to use public rights of way) to provide a public ownership alternative to those renewals, and they had strong support among some members of the City Council. But neither the mayor or the majority of councilmembers.

In addition to public ownership, advocates for the idea also saw the prospect of incorporating what is called distributed energy generation or very localized generators of renewable resources – like wind, solar and energy storage – into the city’s neighborhoods as well as ways for consumers to conserve.

The PR campaign succeeded in tabling the municipal ownership proposal - for the time being - but the notion of distributed and “democratized” energy as the wave of the future continues and might well include resurrected legislation to give the public a piece of the energy pie. For those who support public ownership, the idea survives the PR campaign which included promises by the big guys to work with advocates and city officials to advance these new notions of distributed power.

Minneapolis was a testing ground and may remain that way, but the revolution – or evolution - within the power generation community to change the way energy providers and users alike view renewables continues.

This is not a subject the average citizen or consumer knows much about and it will take public understanding and buy-in to see the advantages of bringing power generation into communities on a smaller scale (rather than large, fossil fuel – coal and natural gas - power plants) and storing the surplus or feeding it up to the larger power grid for savings, control and responsible uses.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with researchers and advocates who see this as the future of energy generation and distribution in hopes of bring more enlightenment to a public often satisfied by successfully switching on lights or the television set and heating the water or cooking. We’ll try to keep it simple and keep public policy concerns in mind as we do.

GUESTS:

JOHN FARRELL – Director of Democratic Energy and the Energy Self-Reliant States and Communities program, Institute for Local Self-Reliance; authorDemocratizing the Electricity System – A Vision for the 21st Century Grid.

TIMOTHY DENHERDER-THOMAS – General Manager, Cooperative Energy Futures

TruthToTell - Dec 9: LOCAL POWER GENERATION/OWNERSHIP: The People’s Energy Solutions - Audio Here;Video Coming

On-air date: 
Mon, 12/09/2013
Listen to or download this episode here: 

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

Not too many months ago, a budding movement toward municipal ownership of energy generation in Minneapolis was cut short by a major public relations campaign by current private regulated monopoly providers, Xcel (for electric service) and CenterPoint Energy (formerly Minnegasco) to defeat the proposal.

The proposers were trying to take advantage of the city’s infrequent power franchise renewal process (where Xcel and CenterPoint pay fees to use public rights of way) to provide a public ownership alternative to those renewals, and they had strong support among some members of the City Council. But neither the mayor or the majority of councilmembers.

In addition to public ownership, advocates for the idea also saw the prospect of incorporating what is called distributed energy generation or very localized generators of renewable resources – like wind, solar and energy storage – into the city’s neighborhoods as well as ways for consumers to conserve.

The PR campaign succeeded in tabling the municipal ownership proposal - for the time being - but the notion of distributed and “democratized” energy as the wave of the future continues and might well include resurrected legislation to give the public a piece of the energy pie. For those who support public ownership, the idea survives the PR campaign which included promises by the big guys to work with advocates and city officials to advance these new notions of distributed power.

Minneapolis was a testing ground and may remain that way, but the revolution – or evolution - within the power generation community to change the way energy providers and users alike view renewables continues.

This is not a subject the average citizen or consumer knows much about and it will take public understanding and buy-in to see the advantages of bringing power generation into communities on a smaller scale (rather than large, fossil fuel – coal and natural gas - power plants) and storing the surplus or feeding it up to the larger power grid for savings, control and responsible uses.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI talk with researchers and advocates who see this as the future of energy generation and distribution in hopes of bring more enlightenment to a public often satisfied by successfully switching on lights or the television set and heating the water or cooking. We’ll try to keep it simple and keep public policy concerns in mind as we do.

GUESTS:

JOHN FARRELL – Director of Democratic Energy and the Energy Self-Reliant States and Communities program, Institute for Local Self-Reliance; authorDemocratizing the Electricity System – A Vision for the 21st Century Grid.

TIMOTHY DENHERDER-THOMAS – General Manager, Cooperative Energy Futures

TruthToTell: Community Connections- Returning Homes- Stabilizing communities after the housing crisis

On Wednesday, November 13, TruthToTell returned to the Minneapolis Urban League for the 9th in its Community Connections series of on-location public forums. In this month’s forum, TTT looks at the ripple effects of still ever-present foreclosures in the Twin Cities Metro and solutions for community stabilization in the wake storm.

Nov. 18- Encore- Community Connections VIIII- Returning Homes: Stabilizing communities after the housing crisis

TruthToTell held its 9th Community Connections forum on Wednesday, November 13 at the Minneapolis Urban League where Andy and Michelle discussed with panelists and audience members what policies and other actions are still needed to stabilize housing in Twin Cities communities that have been ravaged by foreclosures.

On Wednesday, November 13, TruthToTell returned to the Minneapolis Urban League for the 9th in its Community Connections series of on-location public forums. In this month’s forum, TTT looks at the ripple effects of still ever-present foreclosures in the Twin Cities Metro and solutions for community stabilization in the wake storm (click here to see our video preview). While we keep hearing about the “improving” economy, dropping unemployment rates, and a rising Dow Jones average, the rate of home foreclosures is still much higher than we ever saw before the crash in 2007-2008, and these rates remain highest among low-wealth communities and communities of color. Why are banks still throwing so many people out of their houses and on to the streets? Why do banks refuse to re-negotiate mortgages with homeowners based on current market rate rather than demanding exorbitant amounts of money from them to stay in their home, especially when the next step after the home owner can’t pay is usually to auction off that home at a fraction of what the bank was demanding?

As a result of these foreclosures and subsequent evictions, we see an unfortunate correlation between the rise in demand for rental properties and an increase in rental rates, as well as an increase in boarded up vacant houses and rise in homelessness. We’ll talk to our panelists, who are all organizers trying to mitigate the effects of this housing bubble. 

Please join us this Monday, for the encore presentation of Wednesday evening’s conversation where TTT hosts Andy Driscoll and Michelle Alimoradi talked with the panelists and audience members about policies that have already been passed, policies that are still needed, and other actions that organizers and community members could take to bring stability back to the communities that have been most affected by the housing crisis. 

TruthToTell: Community Connections is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has enabled TruthToTell to partner with KFAI Fresh Air Radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners to present these discussions and dialogues on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics for radio, television and online distribution.

On-air guests: 

ED GOETZ- Director, CURA Housing Forum at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs

VIC ROSENTHAL- Executive Director, Jewish Community Action

JAYMIE KELLY- Home-owner facing foreclosure in South Minneapolis, recent mayoral candidate

ANTHONY NEWBY- Executive Director, Neighborhoods Organizing for Change

TruthToTell, Nov. 18- TruthToTell: Community Connections VIIII- Returning Homes: Stabilizing communities after the housing crisis

On-air date: 
Mon, 11/18/2013
Listen to or download this episode here: 

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

On Wednesday, November 13, TruthToTell returned to the Minneapolis Urban League for the 9th in its Community Connections series of on-location public forums. In this month’s forum, TTT looks at the ripple effects of still ever-present foreclosures in the Twin Cities Metro and solutions for community stabilization in the wake storm (click here to see our video preview). While we keep hearing about the “improving” economy, dropping unemployment rates, and a rising Dow Jones average, the rate of home foreclosures is still much higher than we ever saw before the crash in 2007-2008, and these rates remain highest among low-wealth communities and communities of color. Why are banks still throwing so many people out of their houses and on to the streets? Why do banks refuse to re-negotiate mortgages with homeowners based on current market rate rather than demanding exorbitant amounts of money from them to stay in their home, especially when the next step after the home owner can’t pay is usually to auction off that home at a fraction of what the bank was demanding?

As a result of these foreclosures and subsequent evictions, we see an unfortunate correlation between the rise in demand for rental properties and an increase in rental rates, as well as an increase in boarded up vacant houses and rise in homelessness. We’ll talk to our panelists, who are all organizers trying to mitigate the effects of this housing bubble. Please join us this Monday, for the encore presentation of Wednesday evening’s conversation where TTT hosts Andy Driscoll and Michelle Alimoradi talked with the panelists and audience members about policies that have already been passed, policies that are still needed, and other actions that organizers and community members could take to bring stability back to the communities that have been most affected by the housing crisis. 

On-air guests:

ED GOETZ- Director, CURA Housing Forum at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs

VIC ROSENTHAL- Executive Director, Jewish Community Action

JAYMIE KELLY- Home-owner facing foreclosure in South Minneapolis, recent mayoral candidate

ANTHONY NEWBY- Executive Director, Neighborhoods Organizing for Change

TruthToTell: Community Connections is made possible by a generous grant from the Bush Foundation, which has enabled TruthToTell to partner with KFAI Fresh Air Radio, St. Paul Neighborhood Network (SPNN), and selected community partners to present these discussions and dialogues on important issues like education, the environment, health care, politics and elections, transportation, Native concerns, youth issues and more, into the key communities affected by these respective topics for radio, television and online distribution.