social justice

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Hope After the Pope?

On-air date: 
Mon, 10/05/2015
Listen to or download this episode here: 

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The crowds have dispersed. The television images of an inspirational Pope connecting with Americans of all backgrounds in huge rallies and more intimate settings have been replaced by coverage of politics, Trump style.

University of St. Thomas theologian Paul Wojda looks back on Pope Francis’s visit to the United States and forward to the work that lies ahead. What will be the lasting impact of the Pope’s visit on the Catholic Church and the American body politic? Will his social-justice teaching create a space for a deeper dialogue on climate change, immigration, and the needs of the poor? Can the hope that Pope Francis inspired be sustained?

For ongoing coverage of the Pope from a progressive Catholic perspective go to www.ncronline.org

What Difference Can a Pope Make? Pope Francis on Climate Change and Social Justice

On-air date: 
Mon, 06/22/2015
Listen to or download this episode here: 

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The much anticipated release of Pope Francis’s Encyclical on Climate Change was greeted with jubilation by environmentalists and social justice advocates around the world. In his 192-page message, Laudatu Si (“Praise Be”), the Pope links climate change to the over-arching theme of his papacy — fighting global inequality and poverty.

In the short time that he has been Pope, Francis has inspired millions — and not only Catholics.  Certainly his insistence that climate change is real, man-made and requires a massive response by individuals, corporations, and governments comes at a critical time. But can the Pope’s teaching and example really make a difference?  Will climate skeptics inside the Church and in the general public re-examine their views and perhaps even their conscience?

To help us understand the Pope’s message on climate change, as well as his larger impact, TTT is joined by:

Dr. Paul Wojda, associate professor of theology at the University of St. Thomas.

Matt Gladhue, organizer for ISAIAIH, a congregation-based social justice organization

Dr. David Pellow, sociologist and environmental justice scholar, recently with the Institute for Advanced Studies at the University of Minnesota

The Arc of Justice Bends, But in What Direction: Reports From Four Social Justice Campaigns at the Minnesota Legislature

On-air date: 
Sun, 03/29/2015
Listen to or download this episode here: 

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The 2015 legislative session began with hope and a question mark.  After important progressive gains in 2013-2014, voters returned the Minnesota House to Republican control.  Through persistent lobbying and powerful personal testimony, campaigns to restore voting rights to felons and allow Minnesotans access to a driver’s license regardless of immigration status passed the state senate and have won support from many Republican House members where these issues currently hang in the balance.

Meanwhile,  Minnesota home care workers, fresh off their historic organizing campaign of 2014, have bargained the first-ever contract for home health care working in Minnesota and are working hard to secure legislative approval.   And Invest in Minnesota, a broad-based coalition of labor, religious, and community organizations, is back once again to fight for a progressive and fair tax system.

 

Monday, Jan 27: Socialism: It’s Not a Dirty Word

Help TTT continue to produce hyper local public affairs programming like this each week. Donate to TruthToTell's parent, CivicMedia-Minnesota today!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The United States is unique among the world’s democracies in the relative absence of socialism as an accepted worldview and political movement.Unlike most democracies, the U.S. does not have socialist party capable of winning major elections – a fact that might surprise some Tea Party members who insist that President Barak Obama is himself a socialist!

Yet socialism has played an important role in American history—especially here in Minnesota, where socialists were at the heart of the labor and progressive farm movements, were elected mayors and city council members in both Minneapolis and St. Paul and played a critical role in the foundation of the Farmer-Labor Party.  And signs that history may be repeating itself surfaced in Minneapolis this past November when Ty Moore of Socialist Alternative came within 229 votes of being elected to the city council.

Given the growing divide between the 1 percent and the rest of us and the continued ability of corporate America to shape our political choices, it is no wonder that socialist ideas are making a comeback.  And while large numbers of Americans continue to favor capitalism over socialism, a 2011 poll by Pew Research showed that 49 % of respondents between the ages of 20 and 29 had a positive view of socialism compared to 43 % for capitalism.  Interestingly, the same poll showed Blacks favoring socialism over capitalism by 59% to 34 % and Liberal Democrats preferring socialism by a similar margin. 

Without giving too much credence to one opinion survey, the combination of social trends and renewed organizing on the ground suggests that we may be in for a renewed encounter with socialist ideas and politics.  So what is socialism anyway?  Is there more than one kind?  What role has socialism played in our political history—and perhaps most importantly, what role will it play in the months and years ahead?

To help us think about these questions TruthtoTell’s Andy Driscoll and guest co-host Tom O’Connell welcome two guests who are deeply familiar with socialism past and present. Tune in Monday at 9am. 

On-air guests: 

PETER RACHLEFF- Professor Emeritus in History, Macalester College, social justice activist

TY MOORE- Recent Socialist Alternative Minneapolis City Council Candidate

TruthToTell, Monday, Jan 27: Socialism: It’s Not a Dirty Word

On-air date: 
Mon, 01/27/2014
Listen to or download this episode here: 

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Perhaps your browser cannot display it, or maybe it did not initialize correctly.

Help TTT continue to produce hyper local public affairs programming like this each week. Donate to TruthToTell's parent, CivicMedia-Minnesota today!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The United States is unique among the world’s democracies in the relative absence of socialism as an accepted worldview and political movement. Unlike most democracies, the U.S. does not have socialist party capable of winning major elections – a fact that might surprise some Tea Party members who insist that President Barak Obama is himself a socialist!

Yet socialism has played an important role in American history—especially here in Minnesota, where socialists were at the heart of the labor and progressive farm movements, were elected mayors and city council members in both Minneapolis and St. Paul and played a critical role in the foundation of the Farmer-Labor Party.  And signs that history may be repeating itself surfaced in Minneapolis this past November when Ty Moore of Socialist Alternative came within 229 votes of being elected to the city council.

Given the growing divide between the 1 percent and the rest of us and the continued ability of corporate America to shape our political choices, it is no wonder that socialist ideas are making a comeback.  And while large numbers of Americans continue to favor capitalism over socialism, a 2011 poll by Pew Research showed that 49 % of respondents between the ages of 20 and 29 had a positive view of socialism compared to 43 % for capitalism.  Interestingly, the same poll showed Blacks favoring socialism over capitalism by 59% to 34 % and Liberal Democrats preferring socialism by a similar margin. 

Without giving too much credence to one opinion survey, the combination of social trends and renewed organizing on the ground suggests that we may be in for a renewed encounter with socialist ideas and politics.  So what is socialism anyway?  Is there more than one kind?  What role has socialism played in our political history—and perhaps most importantly, what role will it play in the months and years ahead?

To help us think about these questions TruthtoTell’s Andy Driscoll and guest co-host Tom O’Connell welcome two guests who are deeply familiar with socialism past and present. Tune in Monday at 9am. 

On-air guests:

PETER RACHLEFF- Professor Emeritus in History, Macalester College, social justice activist

TY MOORE- Recent Socialist Alternative Minneapolis City Council Candidate

CORRECTION: First Person Radio-Weds, Sep 28 @9AM: LARRY LONG: Troubadour-Voice of Justice-KFAI FM90.3/106.7/@KFAI.org; TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

AND: IT'S MEMBERSHIP WEEK  at KFAI – JOIN Supporters - 612-375-9030.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

AND: IT'S MEMBERSHIP WEEK  at KFAI – JOIN Supporters - 612-375-9030.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Join us on September 28th as First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talk with Larry Long,extraordinary composer and musician who has been part of the Indian community for decades. His music and ability to engage Indian children in song making are legendary. Larry will talk about his life and work, and introduce his new release: "Don't Stand Still."

Larry Long, called "a true American Troubadour" by author Studs Terkel, has made his life work the celebration of American stories and heroes. In a curriculum called Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song,™ he has brought these heroes to the classroom to share their oral history with our younger generation. The children then go on to create songs and lyrical work that celebrate the history and triumphs of their own communities and learn in the process to honor the struggles of different cultures.

"Larry Long is doing what more singers and songwriters 
should be doing: using music to help people learn 
to work together, and bring a world of peace."  —PETE SEEGER

Now a Smithsonian Folkways recording artist, Larry has sung at major festivals, concerts and events throughout the U.S. and internationally. Long is a recipient of the prestigious Bush Artists Fellowship, the Pope John XXIII Award and In The Spirit of Crazy Horse Award; and a Parent’s Choice Award for producing with the Southern Poverty Law Center, I Will Be Your Friend, a songs and activities book for young peacemakers.

He has worked in southern rural communities combining black, white, Native American and Latin stories. In the mid-1980s he assembled the first hometown tribute to Woody Guthrie in Okemah, Oklahoma, which today has evolved into a large, free festival with an array of established and upcoming artists.

Larry's  new release - available at http://www.larrylong.org/   

HEAR A SAMPLE OF LARRY'S WORK HERE

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare-Download or LISTEN HERE – VIDEO HERE

Except for our children – and perhaps not even them – is there any subject that evokes more emotion than the roles our fellow mammals and living creatures – animals other than humans – play in our collective lives? We own them to the point of making them family – a killer when we spend most of waking lives thinking about them and doing for them as we would a baby – only longer, only to mourn their passing as we would our own child when they don’t live as long as we do. At the same time, we make our weekly way to the supermarket to replenish our larders with fresh cuts of beef, pork, lamb, veal or poultry. No matter our family or religious tradition, at least a couple of our most cherished holidays center around meals of meat – turkey, ham, pork roast, bacon, sausage, leg of lamb.

Some people have rebelled against all of these practices and abandoned any use or encouragement of uses of any and all animals. Most of these advocates call themselves vegan. Others – especially those promoting animal welfare – believe that animal use for all the reasons cited have saved lives, fed us, sacrificed themselves for our better health, and entertained us, mostly without abuse or suffering, something we’d never tolerate at home.

Animals are abused. Their defenders have descended on the cavalier forces of entertainment, farming, and research. Any time an animal appears in a film, a promise is issued in the credits that no animals, even those who appeared to have been hurt or differed, actually were. Animals suffer severely for making us food and becoming our food, for entertaining us and pulling us around. The question may be: can we, could we, ever get along without them and, if we must use them, what can we do to eliminate the abuses we know take place in so many arenas of our lives – even among our domestic dogs and cats.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI speak with advocates all around the wheel of animal rights and animal welfare. You cannot believe how many different organizations represent one view or the other along this spectrum of animals in our lives. No program could possibly accommodate the hundreds of various advocates for one position or another.

And yet almost all of us love our dogs and/or cats, birds, fish and sundry family members with tails and such.

GUESTS:

CYNTHIA S. GILLETT, DVM, ACLAM, CPIA – Institutional Veterinarian; Executive Director, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC); Director, Research Animal Resources, University of Minnesota

UNNY NAMBUDIRIPAD – Executive Director, Compassionate Action for Animals

MARILOU CHANRASMI –  Co-Founder, Board Member and Former President, Minnesota Partnership for Animal Welfare (MnPAW), Former President and current Board Member, Pet Haven, Inc.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Join us on September 28th as First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talk with Larry Long, extraordinary composer and musician who has been part of the Indian community for decades. His music and ability to engage Indian children in song making are legendary. Larry will talk about his life and work, and introduce his new release: "Don't Stand Still."

Larry Long, called "a true American Troubadour" by author Studs Terkel, has made his life work the celebration of American stories and heroes. In a curriculum called Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song,™ he has brought these heroes to the classroom to share their oral history with our younger generation. The children then go on to create songs and lyrical work that celebrate the history and triumphs of their own communities and learn in the process to honor the struggles of different cultures.

"Larry Long is doing what more singers and songwriters 
should be doing: using music to help people learn 
to work together, and bring a world of peace."  —PETE SEEGER

Now a Smithsonian Folkways recording artist, Larry has sung at major festivals, concerts and events throughout the U.S. and internationally. Long is a recipient of the prestigious Bush Artists Fellowship, the Pope John XXIII Award and In The Spirit of Crazy Horse Award; and a Parent’s Choice Award for producing with the Southern Poverty Law Center, I Will Be Your Friend, a songs and activities book for young peacemakers.

He has worked in southern rural communities combining black, white, Native American and Latin stories. In the mid-1980s he assembled the first hometown tribute to Woody Guthrie in Okemah, Oklahoma, which today has evolved into a large, free festival with an array of established and upcoming artists.

Larry's  new release - available at http://www.larrylong.org/   

HEAR A SAMPLE OF LARRY'S WORK BELOW - Press the PLAY button.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare-Download or LISTEN HERE – VIDEO HERE

Except for our children – and perhaps not even them – is there any subject that evokes more emotion than the roles our fellow mammals and living creatures – animals other than humans – play in our collective lives? We own them to the point of making them family – a killer when we spend most of waking lives thinking about them and doing for them as we would a baby – only longer, only to mourn their passing as we would our own child when they don’t live as long as we do. At the same time, we make our weekly way to the supermarket to replenish our larders with fresh cuts of beef, pork, lamb, veal or poultry. No matter our family or religious tradition, at least a couple of our most cherished holidays center around meals of meat – turkey, ham, pork roast, bacon, sausage, leg of lamb.

Some people have rebelled against all of these practices and abandoned any use or encouragement of uses of any and all animals. Most of these advocates call themselves vegan. Others – especially those promoting animal welfare – believe that animal use for all the reasons cited have saved lives, fed us, sacrificed themselves for our better health, and entertained us, mostly without abuse or suffering, something we’d never tolerate at home.

Animals are abused. Their defenders have descended on the cavalier forces of entertainment, farming, and research. Any time an animal appears in a film, a promise is issued in the credits that no animals, even those who appeared to have been hurt or differed, actually were. Animals suffer severely for making us food and becoming our food, for entertaining us and pulling us around. The question may be: can we, could we, ever get along without them and, if we must use them, what can we do to eliminate the abuses we know take place in so many arenas of our lives – even among our domestic dogs and cats.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI speak with advocates all around the wheel of animal rights and animal welfare. You cannot believe how many different organizations represent one view or the other along this spectrum of animals in our lives. No program could possibly accommodate the hundreds of various advocates for one position or another.

And yet almost all of us love our dogs and/or cats, birds, fish and sundry family members with tails and such.

GUESTS:

CYNTHIA S. GILLETT, DVM, ACLAM, CPIA – Institutional Veterinarian; Executive Director, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC); Director, Research Animal Resources, University of Minnesota

UNNY NAMBUDIRIPAD – Executive Director, Compassionate Action for Animals

MARILOU CHANRASMI –  Co-Founder, Board Member and Former President, Minnesota Partnership for Animal Welfare (MnPAW), Former President and current Board Member, Pet Haven, Inc.

First Person Radio-Sep 7: LARRY LONG: Troubadour-Voice of Justice; TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

AND: IT'S MEMBERSHIP WEEK  at KFAI – JOIN Supporters - 612-375-9030.

HELP US BRING YOU THESE IMPORTANT DISCUSSIONS OF COMMUNITY INTEREST – PLEASE DONATE HERE!

AND: IT'S MEMBERSHIP WEEK  at KFAI – JOIN Supporters - 612-375-9030.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Join us on September 28th as First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talk with Larry Long,extraordinary composer and musician who has been part of the Indian community for decades. His music and ability to engage Indian children in song making are legendary. Larry will talk about his life and work, and introduce his new release: "Don't Stand Still."

Larry Long, called "a true American Troubadour" by author Studs Terkel, has made his life work the celebration of American stories and heroes. In a curriculum called Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song,™ he has brought these heroes to the classroom to share their oral history with our younger generation. The children then go on to create songs and lyrical work that celebrate the history and triumphs of their own communities and learn in the process to honor the struggles of different cultures.

"Larry Long is doing what more singers and songwriters 
should be doing: using music to help people learn 
to work together, and bring a world of peace."  —PETE SEEGER

Now a Smithsonian Folkways recording artist, Larry has sung at major festivals, concerts and events throughout the U.S. and internationally. Long is a recipient of the prestigious Bush Artists Fellowship, the Pope John XXIII Award and In The Spirit of Crazy Horse Award; and a Parent’s Choice Award for producing with the Southern Poverty Law Center, I Will Be Your Friend, a songs and activities book for young peacemakers.

He has worked in southern rural communities combining black, white, Native American and Latin stories. In the mid-1980s he assembled the first hometown tribute to Woody Guthrie in Okemah, Oklahoma, which today has evolved into a large, free festival with an array of established and upcoming artists.

Larry's  new release - available at http://www.larrylong.org/   

HEAR A SAMPLE OF LARRY'S WORK HERE

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare-Download or LISTEN HERE – VIDEO HERE

Except for our children – and perhaps not even them – is there any subject that evokes more emotion than the roles our fellow mammals and living creatures – animals other than humans – play in our collective lives? We own them to the point of making them family – a killer when we spend most of waking lives thinking about them and doing for them as we would a baby – only longer, only to mourn their passing as we would our own child when they don’t live as long as we do. At the same time, we make our weekly way to the supermarket to replenish our larders with fresh cuts of beef, pork, lamb, veal or poultry. No matter our family or religious tradition, at least a couple of our most cherished holidays center around meals of meat – turkey, ham, pork roast, bacon, sausage, leg of lamb.

Some people have rebelled against all of these practices and abandoned any use or encouragement of uses of any and all animals. Most of these advocates call themselves vegan. Others – especially those promoting animal welfare – believe that animal use for all the reasons cited have saved lives, fed us, sacrificed themselves for our better health, and entertained us, mostly without abuse or suffering, something we’d never tolerate at home.

Animals are abused. Their defenders have descended on the cavalier forces of entertainment, farming, and research. Any time an animal appears in a film, a promise is issued in the credits that no animals, even those who appeared to have been hurt or differed, actually were. Animals suffer severely for making us food and becoming our food, for entertaining us and pulling us around. The question may be: can we, could we, ever get along without them and, if we must use them, what can we do to eliminate the abuses we know take place in so many arenas of our lives – even among our domestic dogs and cats.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI speak with advocates all around the wheel of animal rights and animal welfare. You cannot believe how many different organizations represent one view or the other along this spectrum of animals in our lives. No program could possibly accommodate the hundreds of various advocates for one position or another.

And yet almost all of us love our dogs and/or cats, birds, fish and sundry family members with tails and such.

GUESTS:

CYNTHIA S. GILLETT, DVM, ACLAM, CPIA – Institutional Veterinarian; Executive Director, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC); Director, Research Animal Resources, University of Minnesota

UNNY NAMBUDIRIPAD – Executive Director, Compassionate Action for Animals

MARILOU CHANRASMI –  Co-Founder, Board Member and Former President, Minnesota Partnership for Animal Welfare (MnPAW), Former President and current Board Member, Pet Haven, Inc.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Join us on September 28th as First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock with Andy Driscoll talk with Larry Long, extraordinary composer and musician who has been part of the Indian community for decades. His music and ability to engage Indian children in song making are legendary. Larry will talk about his life and work, and introduce his new release: "Don't Stand Still."

Larry Long, called "a true American Troubadour" by author Studs Terkel, has made his life work the celebration of American stories and heroes. In a curriculum called Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song,™ he has brought these heroes to the classroom to share their oral history with our younger generation. The children then go on to create songs and lyrical work that celebrate the history and triumphs of their own communities and learn in the process to honor the struggles of different cultures.

"Larry Long is doing what more singers and songwriters 
should be doing: using music to help people learn 
to work together, and bring a world of peace."  —PETE SEEGER

Now a Smithsonian Folkways recording artist, Larry has sung at major festivals, concerts and events throughout the U.S. and internationally. Long is a recipient of the prestigious Bush Artists Fellowship, the Pope John XXIII Award and In The Spirit of Crazy Horse Award; and a Parent’s Choice Award for producing with the Southern Poverty Law Center, I Will Be Your Friend, a songs and activities book for young peacemakers.

He has worked in southern rural communities combining black, white, Native American and Latin stories. In the mid-1980s he assembled the first hometown tribute to Woody Guthrie in Okemah, Oklahoma, which today has evolved into a large, free festival with an array of established and upcoming artists.

Larry's  new release - available at http://www.larrylong.org/   

HEAR A SAMPLE OF LARRY'S WORK BELOW - Press the PLAY button.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TruthToTell, Sept 26: OUR ANIMALS, OURSELVES: Animal Rights&Welfare-Download or LISTEN HERE – VIDEO HERE

Except for our children – and perhaps not even them – is there any subject that evokes more emotion than the roles our fellow mammals and living creatures – animals other than humans – play in our collective lives? We own them to the point of making them family – a killer when we spend most of waking lives thinking about them and doing for them as we would a baby – only longer, only to mourn their passing as we would our own child when they don’t live as long as we do. At the same time, we make our weekly way to the supermarket to replenish our larders with fresh cuts of beef, pork, lamb, veal or poultry. No matter our family or religious tradition, at least a couple of our most cherished holidays center around meals of meat – turkey, ham, pork roast, bacon, sausage, leg of lamb.

Some people have rebelled against all of these practices and abandoned any use or encouragement of uses of any and all animals. Most of these advocates call themselves vegan. Others – especially those promoting animal welfare – believe that animal use for all the reasons cited have saved lives, fed us, sacrificed themselves for our better health, and entertained us, mostly without abuse or suffering, something we’d never tolerate at home.

Animals are abused. Their defenders have descended on the cavalier forces of entertainment, farming, and research. Any time an animal appears in a film, a promise is issued in the credits that no animals, even those who appeared to have been hurt or differed, actually were. Animals suffer severely for making us food and becoming our food, for entertaining us and pulling us around. The question may be: can we, could we, ever get along without them and, if we must use them, what can we do to eliminate the abuses we know take place in so many arenas of our lives – even among our domestic dogs and cats.

TTT’s ANDY DRISCOLL and MICHELLE ALIMORADI speak with advocates all around the wheel of animal rights and animal welfare. You cannot believe how many different organizations represent one view or the other along this spectrum of animals in our lives. No program could possibly accommodate the hundreds of various advocates for one position or another.

And yet almost all of us love our dogs and/or cats, birds, fish and sundry family members with tails and such.

GUESTS:

CYNTHIA S. GILLETT, DVM, ACLAM, CPIA – Institutional Veterinarian; Executive Director, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC); Director, Research Animal Resources, University of Minnesota

UNNY NAMBUDIRIPAD – Executive Director, Compassionate Action for Animals

MARILOU CHANRASMI –  Co-Founder, Board Member and Former President, Minnesota Partnership for Animal Welfare (MnPAW), Former President and current Board Member, Pet Haven, Inc.

First Person Radio-Sep 28: LARRY LONG: Troubadour-Voice of Justice - Listen Below

On-air date: 
Wed, 09/28/2011

First Person Radio's Laura Waterman Wittstock talks with Larry Long, extraordinary composer and musician who has been part of the Indian community for decades. His music and ability to engage Indian children in song making are legendary. Larry will talk about his life and work, and introduce his new release: "Don't Stand Still."

Larry Long, called "a true American Troubadour" by author Studs Terkel, has made his life work the celebration of American stories and heroes. In a curriculum called Elders’ Wisdom, Children’s Song,™ he has brought these heroes to the classroom to share their oral history with our younger generation. The children then go on to create songs and lyrical work that celebrate the history and triumphs of their own communities and learn in the process to honor the struggles of different cultures.

"Larry Long is doing what more singers and songwriters 
should be doing: using music to help people learn 
to work together, and bring a world of peace."  —PETE SEEGER

Now a Smithsonian Folkways recording artist, Larry has sung at major festivals, concerts and events throughout the U.S. and internationally. Long is a recipient of the prestigious Bush Artists Fellowship, the Pope John XXIII Award and In The Spirit of Crazy Horse Award; and a Parent’s Choice Award for producing with the Southern Poverty Law Center, I Will Be Your Friend, a songs and activities book for young peacemakers.

He has worked in southern rural communities combining black, white, Native American and Latin stories. In the mid-1980s he assembled the first hometown tribute to Woody Guthrie in Okemah, Oklahoma, which today has evolved into a large, free festival with an array of established and upcoming artists.

Larry's new release is available at http://www.larrylong.org/.


46:36 minutes (42.67 MB)